Worldless Wednesday

In 1990, when Voyager 1 was about, oh, 4 billion miles from Earth, NASA turned its camera back toward planet Earth and took this photo.



And Carl Sagan said:

"Look again at that dot.

On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives.



The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.



The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.



Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light.



Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.



It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience.

There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known."

~ Carl Sagan


To my dad, who left this "pale blue dot" suddenly, 10 years ago, on December 4, 1999.

You seem so far away.

This mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam just hasn't been the same without you.



That's here, that's home, that's us.

And we miss you very much.


27 comments:

A Vapid Blonde said...

ahhh, beautiful.

slouchy said...

((you))

Kath said...

Beautiful, Josette.
XOXOXOXOXOXOX

palinode said...

That was nice.

Laurie said...

So beautiful.

Maggie, Dammit said...

Wow.

The Absence of Alternatives said...

A beautiful & touching tribute to your father. And to everyone that came before us actually.

Mad said...

The 10th anniversary of my mother's death is about 2 1/2 weeks away. This post is beyond moving.

mamatulip said...

Lovely, J.y

Marian the Librarian said...

Beautiful Josette. My husband's uncle (an astronomer) and cousin both died recently, and this made me think of them. So moving.

Momma Star said...

That was beautiful. Hugs.

Fairly Odd Mother said...

I'm sorry. And very beautiful put.

Her Bad Mother said...

don't even have words. just, those are exactly the words.

Neil said...

That was something else. And I say that in a very positive way. Beautiful.

apathy lounge said...

This was simply gorgeous. And gorgeously simple.

Always Home and Uncool said...

As always, I'm truly impressed.

Headless Mom said...

Really lovely.

I can't imagine what that's like, but I imagine that you should have a ((hug))

Michelle said...

What a beautiful and touching tribute.

jennster said...

hugs

Julie @ The Mom Slant said...

Oof. That threw me for a couple loops.

Love to you, J.

cog said...

that fifth photo, of the girl I assume is a daughter, is a joyous photograph. well done.

Oh, and the post works too. I lost my mom ten years ago, almost eleven now, and I know what you mean.

Phil said...

Namaste.

Nzinga said...

Wow...I feel lucky to have stumbled onto this. Awe-inspiring, so lovely. Thank you for sharing.

Uyin said...

Very good post.

http://troll-beads-trollbeads.blogspot.com/

breedemandweep said...

I just love this. Yes. Thank you.

sweetney said...

kiss. hug. xoxo

custom writing essay said...

I think being a part of the Voyager program with its sister craft Voyager 2, the spacecraft is currently in extended mission, tasked with locating and studying the boundaries of the Solar System, including the Kuiper belt, the heliosphere and interstellar space

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